RV DIY Projects

Shield2Facing

September 9, 2016

Picture of hail the size of, and next to, quarters. Denver 2016.
2016 Hail next to quarters.

Friday I made the storm shield shown here, just in time to save me $300 or more on that front window thanks to the heavy hail (quarter size) which pelted it for about 20 minutes. The sad thing was I had not yet prepared the side flaps to hold it by the wing windows so I had to put it back up due to wind about 3 times, all the while getting pelted. Ouch! So the very next day I finished the side tabs. If you look closely at the photo below, you can see the flap going into the side passenger wing window.

What You Need:

1. Insulation material that looks like bubble wrap placed between two sheets of Mylar. This is similar to windshield covers often sold in auto part departments of stores but it is thicker. Since I have been insulating parts of the camper with this I had plenty on hand.

2. Waterproof material for the wing flap. You only need enough to sew to the main body with enough room to fit into the wing window and allow it to close. One flap for each side.IMG_5258

3. Painter’s tape or similar tape to hold the piece in place while you mark you cut marks.

4. Thread, scissors and optional binding tape. Consider decorative duct tape that is the width you need without cutting. Due to the adhesive properties it should stick on without needing to be sewn. (I used the sew method myself.)

INSTRUCTIONS

Measure the width you need and cut. Place shield on window. Use the wiper blades to help hold in place. Check for adjustments. Use the painter’s tape if you need some holding hands while you work with the project.

Look at the side windows and mark where you will need to sew the flaps onto the shield to properly align them when placing through the windows.   Sew the flaps on and that’s all there is to it.  (Note 7/2017, we now put the flaps in the door itself and there is no need to adjust the placement if you already made it for the wing windows as it works just fine).

Directions:
Place the shield on the window.
Use the wiper blades to hold in proper place.
Open the wing windows on the passenger and drivers sides (or open and use the doors – see above note).
Place the flaps through one at a time, closing the window from the outside (just push it), and that’s it.
Stand back, take a look at it and make any necessary adjustments. Then walk away.

The flaps keep the shield on in strong wind. The shield provides a good resistance against cracking and dents from sand storms and hail. Don’t think it’ll help with baseball size hail but hey, mine was quarter size!

The Journey To Fulltime RVing & Places Been, Places To Go